Welcome to the Early Learning GPS Infant Quiz!

Answer the following questions to get information about your baby’s brain, development and learning. There are no wrong answers! Responses are not stored, so chose the response that best fits your situation.

When you complete the quiz, you can access resources to help you as a parent or caregiver to your baby.

1. How much of your baby's brain will be developed by age of five?

When a baby is first born, his brain is already about 25% the size it will be when he grows up.

By age five, 90% of your baby’s brain and brain connections are developed! Thousands of connections that build language, math and social skills for life.

Why does this matter? Because the connections made in your baby’s brain before age five set the foundation for all his learning as he grows up and become an adult. After age five, new brain connections are harder to make.

You can support your baby’s healthy brain development by:
• Providing healthy foods
• Building a strong bond with your child
• Talking and reading to your child from birth
• Choosing a person or program that can care for your child as you would and help your child learn and grow.

When a child is born, their brain is only 25% developed, but it’s still growing! By the time a child is five years old, 90% of their brain is developed. 

Why does this matter? Because the connections made in your baby’s brain before age five set the foundation for all his learning as he grows up and become an adult. After age five, new brain connections are harder to make.

You can support your baby’s healthy brain development by:
• Providing healthy foods
• Building a strong bond with your child
• Talking and reading to your child from birth
• Choosing a person or program that can care for your child as you would and help your child learn and grow.

Actually 90% of a child’s brain develops by age 5.

Why does this matter? Because the connections made in your baby’s brain before age five set the foundation for all his learning as he grows up and become an adult. After age five, new brain connections are harder to make.

You can support your baby’s healthy brain development by:
• Providing healthy foods
• Building a strong bond with your child
• Talking and reading to your child from birth
• Choosing a person or program that can care for your child as you would and help your child learn and grow.

You’re right! By the time a child is five years old, 90% of their brain is developed. 

Why does this matter? Because the connections made in your baby’s brain before age five set the foundation for all his learning as he grows up and become an adult. After age five, new brain connections are harder to make.

You can support your baby’s healthy brain development by:
• Providing healthy foods
• Building a strong bond with your child
• Talking and reading to your child from birth
• Choosing a person or program that can care for your child as you would and help your child learn and grow.

2. Babies begin to learn when...

Actually, babies begin learning as soon as they’re born!

Most children begin to respond or react to what you say between 9-18 months of age.
 
In order for babies to be able to respond to you, their brains begin learning and building those connections before they are even born! Even in the womb, babies will turn to the melody of their mom’s voice, helping their brains build the circuits to understand language.
Even newborns are taking in everything around them and those experiences are affecting how their brains develop.
 
Holding your baby, talking, reading and playing with her from birth will help your child build those important brain connections long before your baby can speak.

Actually, babies begin to learn before they are born!

Soon after birth, most babies can raise their heads for brief periods when lying on their stomachs. In order to be able to do this, their brains started learning and building connection in the womb!
 
Babies brains work on building all skills at the same time – social skills help develop physical skills which help develop thinking skills. So for your baby to hold up her head, she needs to be developing all those other skills too.
 
Even newborns take in everything around them and those experiences affect how their brains develop. 
 
You can help your baby build those important brain connections by holding, talking, reading and playing with her from birth.

Most babies begin babbling at 3-6 months. In order for your baby to babble, your baby started learning and building brain connections in the womb!

Even newborns are taking in everything around them and those experiences affect how their brains develop.

Holding your baby, talking, reading and playing with her is helping your child build those important brain connections long before your baby can speak.

You’re right!

Babies’ brains are learning and building important brain connections in the womb. This is a great fact to share with your friends and family who are expecting or have young children as well.

Even newborns are taking in everything around them and those experiences are affecting how their brains develop.

You can help your baby build those important brain connections by holding, talking, reading and playing with her from birth.

3. When your baby turns one year old, you would expect him to:

At 9-12 months, a child typically begins to connect words with the objects they name, even if they can’t say the words yet. So if you say “dog,” they know what it means and will point to the dog. We say typical because all children follow the same path (called milestones), but each develops at his own pace.

Check out the typical milestones for your baby’s age on the milestones section at the PA Promise for Children website. There are milestones every 3-6 months for infants and toddlers.

Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher and others in your baby’s life. If you feel that your baby is not meeting some milestones, talk together about what to do next. You may also call the CONNECT helpline for information on local supports and resources at 1-800-692-7288.

By one year old, a child typically begins to connect words with the objects they name, even if they can’t say the words yet.

We say typical because all children follow the same path (called milestones), but each develops at his own pace. It is possible for a child to sprint ahead – or be behind – on a milestone.

Check out the typical milestones for your baby’s age on the milestones section at the PA Promise for Children website. There are milestones every 3-6 months for infants and toddlers.

Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher and others in your baby’s life. If you feel that your baby is not meeting some milestones, talk together about what to do next. You may also call the CONNECT helpline for information on local supports and resources at 1-800-692-7288.

Typically, a child can say about 10 words and use words to say what he wants between 18-21 months old, so this would be a bit advanced for a 12 month old.

By one year old, a child typically begins to connect words with the objects they name, even if they can’t say the words yet.

We say typical because all children follow the same path (called milestones), but each develops at his own pace. It is possible for a child to “sprint” ahead – or be behind – on a milestone.

Check out the typical milestones for your baby’s age on the milestones section at the PA Promise for Children website. There are milestones every 3-6 months for infants and toddlers.

Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher and others in your baby’s life. If you feel that your baby is not meeting some milestones, talk together about what to do next. You may also call the CONNECT helpline for information on local supports and resources at 1-800-692-7288.

Babies develop so quickly, it can be confusing. There are milestones to help you see what babies typically can do every 3-6 months before they are one year old. We say typical because all children follow the same path (called milestones) but develop at his own pace. 

A typical one year old understands a few words besides “mama, dada” and understands that some words represent things, like pointing to the dog when you say “dog.”

If a baby is not babbling at all by 12 months, he may be at risk for an autism spectrum disorder.

Check out the typical milestones for your baby’s age on the milestones section at the PA Promise for Children website. There are milestones every 3-6 months for infants and toddlers.

Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher and others in your baby’s life. If you feel that your baby is not meeting some milestones, talk together about what to do next. You may also call the CONNECT helpline for information on local supports and resources at 1-800-692-7288.

4. You notice that your friend's baby, who is one year old (same age as your baby), can throw a ball, but yours cannot. What do you do?

A one-year old can typically throw a ball, but it’s okay if your baby can’t do it. All children develop at their own pace. No two children are at the exact same stage in their development. Also, a child may sprint ahead on one skill, but be behind on another skill. What really matters is how you help your baby develop to the best of her abilities.

You know your baby best and can do so much to help your baby build important skills.

Take a look at the milestones checklist. Your baby meets a milestone if he/she can do two or more things in the category. Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher, and others close to your baby. Do they feel your baby is meeting these milestones? If not, talk about what you can do next to support your baby. You may also call the CONNECT helpline at 1-800-692-7288 for resources like developmental screening and early intervention services.

Babies learn by doing, so playing games and practicing with them will help them build those skills. Check out the Learning is Everywhere page on the PA’s Promise for Children website. Each month has activities you can do with your child. Each activity is based on Pennsylvania’s early learning standards. So while you are having fun, you are also helping your baby grow!

Helping your baby reach her abilities is the way to go! All children develop at their own pace. It’s okay if your baby can’t do it. No two children are at the exact same stage in their development. Also, a child may sprint ahead on one skill, but be behind on another skill.

You know your baby best and can do so much to help your baby build important skills.

Take a look at the milestones checklist. Your baby meets a milestone if he/she can do two or more things in the category. Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher, and others close to your baby. Do they feel your baby is meeting these milestones? If not, talk about what you can do next to support your baby. You may also call the CONNECT helpline at 1-800-692-7288 for resources like developmental screening and early intervention services.

Babies learn by doing, so playing games and practicing with them will help them build those skills. Check out the Learning is Everywhere page on the PA’s Promise for Children website. Each month has activities you can do with your child. Each activity is based on Pennsylvania’s early learning standards. So while you are having fun, you are also helping your baby grow!

Babies learn by doing, so playing catch with your baby will help her learn this skill. As you build this skill, you also want to get a full picture of how your child is meeting other milestones.

A one-year old can typically throw a ball, but it’s okay if your baby can’t do it. All children develop at their own pace. No two children are at the exact same stage in their development. Also, a child may sprint ahead on one skill, but be behind on another skill. What really matters is how you help your baby develop to the best of her abilities.

You know your baby best and can do so much to help your baby build important skills.

Take a look at the milestones checklist. Your baby meets a milestone if he/she can do two or more things in the category. Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher, and others close to your baby. Do they feel your baby is meeting these milestones? If not, talk about what you can do next to support your baby. You may also call the CONNECT helpline at 1-800-692-7288 for resources like developmental screening and early intervention services.

Babies learn by doing, so playing games and practicing with them will help them build those skills. Check out the Learning is Everywhere page on the PA’s Promise for Children website. Each month has activities you can do with your child. Each activity is based on Pennsylvania’s early learning standards. So while you are having fun, you are also helping your baby grow!

Your pediatrician is a great person to talk to about your child’s development and meeting milestones. But it’s okay if your baby can’t throw a ball at one year old. All children develop at their own pace. No two children are at the exact same stage in their development. A child may sprint ahead on one skill, but be behind on another skill. What really matters is how you help your baby develop to the best of her abilities.

You know your baby best and can do so much to help your baby build important skills

Take a look at the milestones checklist. Your baby meets a milestone if he/she can do two or more things in the category. Share these milestones with your baby’s doctor, teacher, and others close to your baby. Do they feel your baby is meeting these milestones? If not, talk about what you can do next to support your baby. You may also call the CONNECT helpline at 1-800-692-7288 for resources like developmental screening and early intervention services.

Babies learn by doing, so playing games and practicing with them will help them build those skills. Check out the Learning is Everywhere page on the PA’s Promise for Children website. Each month has activities you can do with your child. Each activity is based on Pennsylvania’s early learning standards. So while you are having fun, you are also helping your baby grow!

5. When your baby cries, you usually:

Crying is the only way babies can communicate with you. This is especially true for babies under six months old.

When you respond to your baby quickly, you teach your baby that he matters and can trust you to take care of him. 

Feeding, burping, and giving your baby a lukewarm bath are some ways to soothe a crying baby. While these techniques will work most of the time, nothing works all the time and that’s okay. This doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with you or your baby.

Your love for your baby and the bond you build together is as important to your baby’s development as food or sleep.

Don’t worry about being a perfect parent because it doesn’t exist. Do your best and accept that you may not always know what your child wants.

Here are some tips to help build a strong bond with your baby:

  • Respond to your baby. Try to figure out what your baby’s cries mean and address their needs. When they are hungry, feed them. When they need changing, change them. When they are excited, show you are excited too.
  • Have fun with your baby. Talk, play, hold and read to your baby.

Don’t worry; you can’t spoil a baby by responding to him. Crying is the only way babies can communicate with you. This is especially true for babies under six months old.

When you respond to your baby quickly, you teach your baby that he matters and can trust you to take care of him. 

Feeding, burping, and giving your baby a lukewarm bath are some ways to soothe a crying baby. While these techniques will work most of the time, nothing works all the time and that’s okay. This doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with you or your baby.

Your love for your baby and the bond you build together is as important to your baby’s development as food or sleep.

Don’t worry about being a perfect parent because it doesn’t exist. Do your best and accept that you may not always know what your child wants.

Here are some tips to help build a strong bond with your baby:

  • Respond to your baby. Try to figure out what your baby’s cries mean and address their needs. When they are hungry, feed them. When they need changing, change them. When they are excited, show you are excited too.
  • Have fun with your baby. Talk, play, hold and read to your baby.

It’s great that you try different things to soothe your baby. When you respond to your baby quickly, you teach your baby that he matters and can trust you to take care of him.

Crying is the only way babies can communicate with you. Especially for babies under six months old. When you respond to your baby quickly, you teach your baby that he matters and can trust you to take care of him. 

Feeding, burping, and giving your baby a lukewarm bath are some ways to soothe a crying baby. While these techniques will work most of the time, nothing works all the time and that’s okay. This doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with you or your baby.

Your love for your baby and the bond you build together is as important to your baby’s development as food or sleep.

Don’t worry about being a perfect parent because it doesn’t exist. Do your best and accept that you may not always know what your child wants.

Here are some tips to help build a strong bond with your baby:

  • Respond to your baby. Try to figure out what your baby’s cries mean and address their needs. When they are hungry, feed them. When they need changing, change them. When they are excited, show you are excited too.
  • Have fun with your baby. Talk, play, hold and read to your baby.

There are days we all wish we could just cry like a baby! Don’t worry about being a perfect parent –because it doesn’t exist. Do your best and accept that you may not always know what your child wants.

Figuring out why your baby cries might help lower your stress. Crying is the only way babies can communicate with you. Especially for babies under six months old. As you watch your baby you may see patterns.

Feeding, burping, and giving your baby a lukewarm bath are some ways to soothe a crying baby. While these techniques will work most of the time, nothing works all the time and that’s okay. This doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with you or your baby.

What’s most important is that you try to respond to your baby quickly. Even if you can’t figure out why he’s crying right away, you teach your baby that he matters and can trust you to take care of them. Your love for your baby and the bond you build together is as important to your baby’s development as food or sleep.

Don’t worry about being a perfect parent because it doesn’t exist. Do your best and accept that you may not always know what your child wants.

Here are some tips to help build a strong bond with your baby:

  • Respond to your baby. Try to figure out what your baby’s cries mean and address their needs. When they are hungry, feed them. When they need changing, change them. When they are excited, show you are excited too.
  • Have fun with your baby. Talk, play, hold and read to your baby.

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